Bash Scripts, Elementary OS, Linux

Updated Desktop Slideshow script for ElementaryOS

ElementaryOS logo A few days ago I released a desktop wallpaper slideshow script for ElementaryOS. A user pointed out that it wasn’t changing the login screen wallpaper. I added a fix and now your login screen will have a random background; the same one as the desktop slideshow. If there is a big demand for them to be independant of eachother I may make the desktop slideshow differ from the login screen.

You can still use the -bootonly flag to only set only one random wallpaper once when you log in to ElementaryOS. This will now also change your login screen’s wallpaper.

If you rather not change the login screen background from the default ElementaryOS one you can use the –nologin flag.

To change the login screen you will need qdbus. You can install it with apt-get install qdbus.

I added a bunch of logging which is useful if you give the desktop slideshow script a large number of files to work with. Occasionally you may see an x on your desktop indicating that an image couldn’t load. You can then check the logs with tail -f /var/log/syslog and see what image is giving you issues. Then you can delete it or move it. You must enable logging with the –log flag for this to work.

As always you can get the wallpaper slideshow script from Github. Check out the last post for more information on installing and running the Wallpaper Slideshow script. Let me know if you encounter any issues. Its always good to hear feedback.

Bash Scripts, Linux

Get the size of your BTRFS Snapshots

If you want to get the size of your BTRFS snapshots you would probably use btrfs qgroup show.  This only shows you a list of IDs and the sizes are in bytes. I wrote a script that will convert the sizes from bytes to kilobytes, megabytes or gigabytes. It will combine the IDs with the name of each snapshot or subvolume from btrfs subvolume list to make each row a lot more meaningful.

In the end instead of seeing a list like this:
Screenshot from 2015-05-26 15:47:24

You’ll see:

Detailed information of each BTRFS snapshot
Detailed information of each BTRFS snapshot

Instead of meaningless IDs you now have the name of your BTRFS subvolumes or snapshots. Instead of a hard to decipher string of bytes it converts each amount into the most appropriate unit of measurement. You can also see the total amount of data that is being used by the snapshots.

For this to work you first need to enable  quotas. Run this command to enable quotas if you haven’t done so already:

sudo btrfs quota enable /

You can clone the project from github by running:
git clone https://github.com/agronick/btrfs-size.git

Or you can just go a wget on the script:
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/agronick/btrfs-size/master/btrfs-size.sh

Set it to executable with:
chmod +x ./btrfs-size.sh

Now you can just run the script with: ./btrfs-size.sh

All the columns are pretty self explanatory. The Total column will tell you how much data is in that BTRFS subvolume. The Exclusive Data column is how much data is exclusive to that subvolume. Since BTRFS is a “copy on write” filesystem none of the data is replicated when you create a snapshot. It only needs to make a copy when something changes.

Leave your feedback here to let me know how it worked for you.